Confused dating quotes 101 christian dating guide

13-Feb-2018 19:02

The feeling you call confusion is a big to-do that’s created in your mind when you have all kinds of conflicting thoughts (for example, do it, don’t do it, take a chance, why fix what’s not broken?

I feel as if I've come to a place I never thought I'd have to come to.

So when an opportunity for me to learn from some incredible people next month—for four and a half days, thousands of miles away (the kids will go to bed without me tucking them in for five nights; it literally makes me nauseous to type that)—I knew I couldn’t do it. Although it still seems wrong on many levels, I booked the trip because something deeper and calmer tells me that the wrongness is narrow and subjective.

But just a tiny bit more than that, I knew I had to do it. That was a huge step because, although it’s ultimately my choice, he rarely lets me bow out of things I truly want because of something as minor as insecure, wavering thinking. As soon as I told him, he told me to stop being ridiculous and book the trip. Not just because my husband tells me it’s crazy, but because the wiser part of me sort of knew it was all along. I’m sure I felt abandoned as a kid and don’t want my kids to feel that way, or something along those lines. ” merry-go-round, I get whipped all over the place in a grand gesture of confusion and uncertainty.

I haven’t been away from my kids, and yet I’ve suffered over being away from them. So, knowing that my suffering is only due to my current-moment version of reality helps a lot.

It also helps a lot to remember that nearly every time I’ve been totally positive something will be a horrible experience—yet that tiny knowing voice suggests I do it anyway—it ends up not being so bad.

I feel as if I've come to a place I never thought I'd have to come to.

So when an opportunity for me to learn from some incredible people next month—for four and a half days, thousands of miles away (the kids will go to bed without me tucking them in for five nights; it literally makes me nauseous to type that)—I knew I couldn’t do it. Although it still seems wrong on many levels, I booked the trip because something deeper and calmer tells me that the wrongness is narrow and subjective.

But just a tiny bit more than that, I knew I had to do it. That was a huge step because, although it’s ultimately my choice, he rarely lets me bow out of things I truly want because of something as minor as insecure, wavering thinking. As soon as I told him, he told me to stop being ridiculous and book the trip. Not just because my husband tells me it’s crazy, but because the wiser part of me sort of knew it was all along. I’m sure I felt abandoned as a kid and don’t want my kids to feel that way, or something along those lines. ” merry-go-round, I get whipped all over the place in a grand gesture of confusion and uncertainty.

I haven’t been away from my kids, and yet I’ve suffered over being away from them. So, knowing that my suffering is only due to my current-moment version of reality helps a lot.

It also helps a lot to remember that nearly every time I’ve been totally positive something will be a horrible experience—yet that tiny knowing voice suggests I do it anyway—it ends up not being so bad.

The former just feels a little more trustworthy, a little sounder, and a little more grounded.