Divorce stats online dating

15-Mar-2018 00:17

Couples who hit it off online are less likely get married.

"Even though a large percentage of marriages in recent years have resulted from couples meeting online, looking for partners online may potentially suppress the desire for getting married," says lead study author Dr. According to the new study, 86 percent of online daters are cautious to trust people they meet online for fear they are receiving false information.

Of dating sites, e Harmony fared particularly well — a finding that may raise suspicion because of the funding source.

However, the study could not determine whether or not this has anything to do with how it matches people or anything else specific to the site.

The study found that relationships that start online are 28 percent more likely to end within a year.

Married couples that were introduced online are three times more likely to divorce that those who initially met in-person.

Most of us know long-lasting couples that first connected on the Internet, but researchers from Michigan State University and Stanford found that both divorce and separation rates of people who meet online are higher than those who are first introduced in traditional settings.

Wiederhold, editor- in-chief of Virtual Reality Medical Institute, Brussels, Belgium and Interactive Media Institute.

After studying more than 4,000 couples, relationships were found to be more stable if the pair initially met face-to-face through mutual friends, work, hobbies or social events.

“When you don’t [see each other], you can be more comfortable being yourself.” Being more open, the same studies found, led people to like each other more — something that could obviously influence romantic connections.

When it comes to playing Cupid, it’s still not clear whether online dating ultimately makes better matches.

Most of us know long-lasting couples that first connected on the Internet, but researchers from Michigan State University and Stanford found that both divorce and separation rates of people who meet online are higher than those who are first introduced in traditional settings.Wiederhold, editor- in-chief of Virtual Reality Medical Institute, Brussels, Belgium and Interactive Media Institute.After studying more than 4,000 couples, relationships were found to be more stable if the pair initially met face-to-face through mutual friends, work, hobbies or social events.“When you don’t [see each other], you can be more comfortable being yourself.” Being more open, the same studies found, led people to like each other more — something that could obviously influence romantic connections.When it comes to playing Cupid, it’s still not clear whether online dating ultimately makes better matches.(MORE: Physical Proximity May Help Keep Men in Relationships Faithful) In terms of online venues, marriages begun in chat rooms or online communities were less satisfying than those initiated via online-dating sites, although dating sites themselves varied in terms of the marital satisfaction reported.