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08-Oct-2018 22:29

He was a software engineer or did something in tech (as they all did). I don’t think he asked me a single question about myself.

Our date—if you call these impromptu Internet meetings, dates—lasted an hour.

On the dates, they flash money around, having never really had it before.

One software engineer visiting from the Bay Area was in town for a training session at Amazon before he made the move.

No, I spent a half hour or more listening to him talk about his job.

Since I am not in the tech industry, I don’t understand any of it.

They were there because—as one of them told us—”It was the only place on the Hill on the weekends where there are no bros.”After I posted inquiries on Twitter, I was besieged by women with similar stories of entitlement and dullness in the men of San Francisco and Seattle.

Even men had something (nasty) to say: Wrote one guy to my request, that I “want to hear about your dating life how the men in the tech industry have changed it”: “I think you accidentally said ‘changed,’ but what you meant was ‘ruined forever with their awfulness.’”Why were they so awful?

These guys—and as Reifman pointed it out, it’s very nearly always guys (75 percent of Amazon’s workforce is made up of dudes!

The majority of the guys who are moving here for companies like Amazon seem to be their late 20s or early 30s, and they are new and exploring the city.

And that means they are exploring the city’s women.

I am a journalist, so I am very good at asking questions to get people to talk about themselves. (I stress “weirdos”—there are few people of color in Seattle.) The weirdos were: young gay boys, old hippies of varying sexuality, straight artists and musicians, softball lesbians, punk-rock dykes who played house music, metal musicians, ravers, or people into the fetish scene.

They were not straight, white guys from flyover country or California imported by a software company.

These guys—and as Reifman pointed it out, it’s very nearly always guys (75 percent of Amazon’s workforce is made up of dudes!The majority of the guys who are moving here for companies like Amazon seem to be their late 20s or early 30s, and they are new and exploring the city.And that means they are exploring the city’s women.I am a journalist, so I am very good at asking questions to get people to talk about themselves. (I stress “weirdos”—there are few people of color in Seattle.) The weirdos were: young gay boys, old hippies of varying sexuality, straight artists and musicians, softball lesbians, punk-rock dykes who played house music, metal musicians, ravers, or people into the fetish scene.They were not straight, white guys from flyover country or California imported by a software company.He wore a T-shirt bearing the logo of a 1990s industrial band—maybe it was NIN or Skinny Puppy—and paired it with formless dad jeans, but high on his newfound power drank four or five “special” drinks from the craft cocktail bar, Canon, ordered the foie gras, and racked up a 0 bill in less than two hours. I was not impressed.)He spent the entire time talking about his job and the opportunities it was going to bring him.