Radiometric dating and the age of the earth

29-May-2018 03:05

In a report of his findings published in 1913 in the journal , Holmes expressed the less-than-ecstatic reception his findings received: "The geologist who ten years ago was embarrassed by the shortness of time allowed to him for the evolution of the Earth’s crust , is still more embarrassed with the superabundance with which he is now confronted." The Earth's age continued to be hotly debated for decades afterward. In the 1920s, Earth's age crept up toward 3 billion years, making it for a time even older than the universe, which was then estimated to be about 1.8 billion years old.The best estimate for Earth's age is based on radiometric dating of fragments from the Canyon Diablo iron meteorite.This proves that the half-lives of the uranium and thorium radioactive decays vary ... any age determination using this method of dating will be inaccurate because it is based on an invalid assumption." " ... For example, discordant dates have been obtained on the same rocks by ...

radiometric dating and the age of the earth-75radiometric dating and the age of the earth-49

Before so-called radiometric dating, Earth's age was anybody's guess.Our planet was pegged at a youthful few thousand years old by Bible readers (by counting all the "begats" since Adam) as late as the end of the 19th century, with physicist Lord Kelvin providing another nascent estimate of 100 million years.Kelvin defended this calculation throughout his life, even disputing Darwin's explanations of evolution as impossible in that time period.The only dating methods discussed (over and over) by evolution-believing scientists and the mass media are those that supposedly "prove" that the earth is billions of years old.One of the most popular of these is known as radiometric dating. can be In other words, something in the past caused a significant amount of helium to build up inside these zircons (such as from a rapid decay episode of uranium), yet, in spite of the fact that helium has been observed to leak out readily from these zircons, it has not done so: simply because it hasn't had enough time to do so -- suggesting that the zircons themselves are only a few thousand years old."There is evidence to show ...

Before so-called radiometric dating, Earth's age was anybody's guess.Our planet was pegged at a youthful few thousand years old by Bible readers (by counting all the "begats" since Adam) as late as the end of the 19th century, with physicist Lord Kelvin providing another nascent estimate of 100 million years.Kelvin defended this calculation throughout his life, even disputing Darwin's explanations of evolution as impossible in that time period.The only dating methods discussed (over and over) by evolution-believing scientists and the mass media are those that supposedly "prove" that the earth is billions of years old.One of the most popular of these is known as radiometric dating. can be In other words, something in the past caused a significant amount of helium to build up inside these zircons (such as from a rapid decay episode of uranium), yet, in spite of the fact that helium has been observed to leak out readily from these zircons, it has not done so: simply because it hasn't had enough time to do so -- suggesting that the zircons themselves are only a few thousand years old."There is evidence to show ...The third assumption is that the sample has remained in a closed system.