Xxxhod voice

19-Jan-2018 12:19

It happened that the only time that Walter was ever again sent to deten- tion was for a failure in a long lesson, including much which had been learnt on the morning that he was out of school, 86 ST. which, in consequence, he found it impossible, with all his efforts, to master. Paton saw how mortified and pained he was to fail, and when he sent him to detention, most kindly called him up, and told him that he saw the cause of his unsuccess, and was not in the least displeased at it, although, as he had similarly punished other boys, he could not make any exception to the usual rule of punishment. Percival's turn to sit with the detenus, and seeing Walter among them, he too hastily con- cluded that he was still continuing a career of disgrace. " After what has happened, I should have been ashamed to be sent here, if I were you." After his days and nights of toil, after his long, manly, noble struggle to show his penitence, after his heavy and disproportionate punishment, it was hard to be so addressed by one whom he respected, in the presence of all the idlest in the school, and in consequence of a purely accidental and isolated failure. Percival, having been detained, had not yet come in ; but Henderson, Kenrick, and Power, who had also been asked to tea, were there waiting for him when Walter arrived, and Henderson, as usual, amusing the others and himself with a flood of mimicry and nonsense.

Paton's loss with peculiar sorrow, but was also vexed and disappointed that a boy whose character he had openly defended should have proved so unworthy of his encomium. " he said with chilling scorn, as he passed the seat where Walter sat writing.

And now a spirited contest began between Henderson and Walter.

They were touched by the pluck he showed in spite of his dejected look, and as though to make up for their former deficiency, they clapped him as loud as either of the others.

The last to offer him the right hand of forgiveness, but the best and warmest friend to him when once he had done so, was Mr. He still passed him with only the coldest and most distant recognition, for he not only felt Mr.

FARRAR Author of "Eric, or Little by Little," and "Julian Home," tte. This made him join with great feeling in the singing, and the choirmaster was struck with the strength and rare sweetness of his voice. Edwards said to him, " Evson, there is a vacancy for a treble in the choir ; I heard you sing in chapel to-day, and I think that you would supply the place very well. " Walter very gladly accepted the offer, partly because he hailed the opportunity of learning a little about music, and because the choir boys were allowed several highly- valued and exceptional privileges ; but chiefly because they were always chosen by the masters with express reference to character, and therefore the invitation to join their number was the clearest proof that could be given him that the past was condoned.

Naturally quick and fively as he was, he sat as quiet and attentive in school, as if he had been gifted with a disposition as unmercurial as that of Daubeny himself.

Paton's loss, by doing all that was required of him.

Four feet six and a half they both accomplished — Walter the first time, and Henderson the third.To help support the investigation, you can pull the corresponding error log from your web server and submit it our support team.Please include the Ray ID (which is at the bottom of this error page). Walter had disappeared ; and the boys were again made to feel, by his voluntary absence, what bitterness of heart their unkind conduct caused him. The boys and the spectators now moved off to the pavilion, where the prizes were to be distributed by Mrs. But when Walter's name was called out with Henderson's, only the latter stepped forward.

Four feet six and a half they both accomplished — Walter the first time, and Henderson the third.To help support the investigation, you can pull the corresponding error log from your web server and submit it our support team.Please include the Ray ID (which is at the bottom of this error page). Walter had disappeared ; and the boys were again made to feel, by his voluntary absence, what bitterness of heart their unkind conduct caused him. The boys and the spectators now moved off to the pavilion, where the prizes were to be distributed by Mrs. But when Walter's name was called out with Henderson's, only the latter stepped forward. This was hard work, doubtless ; but it brought its own reward in successful endeavour and an approving conscience.